Getting to know J. R. R. Tolkien’s “Lord of the Rings”

This past week we took a glimpse at J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”

Here is a look at the 7 things we shared this week:


1. We pondered over a passage.

What are some of your thoughts about this quote/passage from “The Fellowship of the Ring”

Picture2


2. We had a little trivia.

Remember when Frodo and his friends were at the Prancing Pony Inn, and Frodo got scared when he thought his friends were going to blab about the ring and their quest (especially Pippin – you know how he is when he’s drunk)?  In a panic, Frodo jumped up on a table and started singing a funny tune. Which nursery-rhyme does this tune relate to?

1. Hey Diddle, Diddle
2. Little Boy Blue
3. Jack and Jill
4. Old Mother Hubbard

The correct answer was Hey Diddle, Diddle


3. We herd a passage from J. R. R. Tolkien.

When Tolkien was asked if he agreed with his books being used in the public school system, he responded:

“No. I am rather against that. I think that a lot of damage is really done to literature in making it a…method of education, but I’m not sure about that.”


4. We shared a “Did you know?”.

Did you know that Tolkien initially wanted “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy to be one volume. This volume was to include another volume “The Silmarillion” which describes the world of Eä in which the lands of Middle Earth is found. The idea was dismissed by his publisher which is why we ended up a three volume set: “The Fellowship of the Ring,” “The Two Towers,” and “The Return of the King.”


5. We shared a short synopsis.

The future of civilization rests in the fate of the One Ring, which has been lost for centuries. Powerful forces are unrelenting in their search for it. But fate has placed it in the hands of a young Hobbit named Frodo Baggins, who inherits the Ring and steps into legend. A daunting task lies ahead for Frodo when he becomes the Ringbearer – to destroy the One Ring in the fires of Mount Doom where it was forged.


6. We showed the trailer for the film adaptation of the books.

There have been two film adaptations of the book, though the second adaptation by Peter Jackson was more critically and commercially successful. It was released in three installments: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002), and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003).


7. We showed readers our selection of Tolkien’s book

buy

You can find the whole collection of “The Lord of the Ring” and many other books by J. R. R. Tolkien at EpicFantasyBooks.com


Thanks for tuning in! Coming up next, we will take a look at David Weber and his Honor Harrington series.

Leave a Reply